How to Drink Gin in the Winter

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Photo by Flickr User Raymond Shobe

Some drinkers believe that gin and other clear spirits are best enjoyed during warm, sunny weather and that darker spirits such as aged rums and whiskeys are best drank in the winter. These people are amateurs and should be tarred and feathered, or at the very least ignored.

The following are the Gintenders suggestions and his recommended proportions on classic gin cocktails that are perfect on cold nights…some are better known then others, but all when mixed with the right gin are delicious. And all along with over 70 gin combinations are available at Wisdom.

The Alexander

Created sometime before 1917. Although the Brandy Alexander is a famous variation, the original was certainly based on gin. The Alexander was a prohibition favorite because the other ingredients could mask harsh “bathtub” gin.

1.5 oz gin (recommend a heavy juniper gin, rye based gin or aged gin for this creamy delight)
0.75 oz crème de cacao
0.75 oz of heavy cream
Shake over ice and strain into coup
Garnish: nutmeg

The Bijou

Originated in the 1890s is believed to have been created by Harry Johnson. “Bijou” translates to “jewel” in French; gin represents diamonds, sweet vermouth-rubies, and Green Chartreuse-emeralds. This drink is a bold a high proof concoction, not for the faint of heart. The Gintender recommends dialing back the chartreuse to better balance the drink.

1.5 oz of gin (recommend a bold juniper gin)
.3 oz of Green Chartreuse
.5 oz of Sweet Vermouth
2 dashes of orange bitters
Stir ingredients over ice and strain into a coup glass
Optional garnish: lemon zest

The Martinez

Now believed to be the precursor of the Martini, the first known recipe for this drink appears in “The Modern Bartender” from 1884. It is debated whether it originally called for Oude genever or old tom gin-which are about as far opposite on the gin flavor spectrum as one can get. Some believe that a man named Julio Richelieu created the drink in 1874 for a goldminer in the Californian town of Martinez, the Gintender just believes it is delicious.

1.5 oz of genever Oude (or any style of gin)
1.5 oz of Cinzano Red
Dash of Cointreau
2 dashes angostura bitters
Shake over ice and strain into a coup

White Lady

Created by Harry MacElhone in 1919, and then recreated by Harry in 1923 as proprietor at Harry’s New York Bar in Paris, France. This drink uses eggwhites which makes some squeamish due to salmonella fears…please decide for yourself. Why use raw eggwhites at all in a cocktail? Their impact on taste is negligible, but they do add a rich, silky, foam texture which is impossible to mimic.

1.5 oz gin (recommend a heavy juniper/spicy gin or rye based gin)
0.5 oz Cointreau
0.5 oz of fresh squeezed lemon
1.0 oz egg white
Dry shake all ingredients, then add ice and shake again. Strain into coup glass

Clover Club

One of the best known gin cocktails whose origin is shrouded in mystery, this cocktail may have originated at the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel in Philadelphia.
Believed to have been around since 1909.

1.5 oz gin (recommend a medium to heavy juniper gin)
1.0 oz dry vermouth
0.25 oz of fresh squeezed lemon
0.25 of grenadine or Guyot crème de cassis (black currant liqueur)
0.5 oz of egg white
Dry shake, then shake over ice and strain into coup

Frostbite

Photo by Colin Higgins

Ingredients:

1.5 oz Tequila

.5 oz White crème de cacao

.5 oz  Curaçao

.5 oz Cream

Maraschino cherry for garnish

 

Instructions:

Shake ingredients well on ice.  Service in old-fashioned glass full of ice.  Garnish with one maraschino cherry.

Bird of Paradise

Photo by flickr user: glenn_e_wilson

Ingredients:

1.25 oz of Silver Tequila

.75 oz of Creme de cacao

.5 oz of Amaretto liqueur

1 oz of Heavy cream*

.75 oz of Milk*

 

Instructions:

Shake with ice and strain into cocktail glass. Dust with nutmeg.

* Can be substituted with Soy